The event started with a screening of the movie “Playing Unfair: the Media Image of the Female Athlete.” This movie was released in 2002, and sometimes showed it datedness. However, it did have some important lessons to offer. The most commonly portrayed sport was road cycling (44 males, 6 females), followed by running (8 males, 3 females), with rock climbing, mountain biking, and triathlon represented to a lesser degree. References here and here. MARY JO KANE: What we know in terms of the data is that women athletes are significantly more likely than male athletes to be portrayed off the court, out of uniform, and in these hyper-feminized roles. These athletes' SAT scores are well above the national average, but far lower than most other students who are admitted into these distinguished schools. The ‘performance gap’ between male and female athletes is proven beyond doubt based on decades of sporting records and it ranges from 10-30% depending on the sport. The movie discussed the widespread acceptance and coinciding backlash of the success and presence of women in sports. It is well established that the difference we see between male and female bodies is driven by exposure to the male sex hormone Testosterone.

The thing that we infrequently see is images of women athletes as athletes. On average female athletes are more likely than male athletes to be portrayed in the media What is clear is the print media marginalizes these athletes through the photographs and commentary within the text. According to a recent survey of 2,501 college students by College Pulse, a majority of students support initiatives to pay college athletes, and an overwhelming 80% of … Transgender female athletes may compete in a female category if they have declared their gender as female for at least 4 years and their blood testosterone levels are below 10 nmol/L for at least 12 months prior to competition. 4 Fifth, recruited athletes tend to finish their college careers in the lower third of their graduating class; many of them dropped off their teams long before their graduation. With regard to social media use according to athlete gender, Geurin-Eagleman and Burch's (2016) comparative study of male and female athletes on Instagram sought to determine whether these cohorts use social media differently in their personal branding efforts. I …